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Pimlico Property Finder

Guide to Pimlico, London SW1

Once the runt of the litter of west London boroughs, Pimlico has long since shaken off its unfashionable status to become one of the more desirable residential areas in the capital while still offering excellent opportunities for the astute investor.

Not quite Mayfair but close enough for the very many who can’t muster Mayfair asking prices, Pimlico took its time to blossom but is now very definitely a location that provides an address that can be worn as a badge of success.
Sitting cheek-by-jowl with opulent Belgravia, Pimlico was long a curiosity, a carefully designed and sumptuously appointed network of streets arranged in a neat grid that seems at odds with so much of the rest of the sprawling behemoth that is London.

And for all its carefully planned layout and impressive early nineteenth century architecture designed by the famed builder Thomas Cubitt, it took a long time for Pimlico to ignite the passions of the fashionably wealthy.

The Duke of Westminster offloaded his significant portfolio of Pimlico property in the 1950s because, some say, he tired of seeing his name mentioned in court cases about the bordellos which the Grosvenor Estate unwittingly found itself housing.

Bedsits and boarding houses were the chief function of so much of Cubitt’s impressive handiwork but that started to change in the early 1970s following the arrival of the Victoria Line tube station and a burgeoning property market.

These days Pimlico is home to countless artists, actors and the anonymously affluent as well as an extraordinary number of MPs who can keep a relatively affordable London pied-a-terre a short commute from Parliament when the division bell sounds.

Winston Churchill is perhaps the area’s most famous former resident along with general Charles de Gaulle while Irish writer Bram Stoker passed away in conventional circumstances in 1912 at his residence in St George’s Square still awaiting the worldwide renown eventually visited upon his gothic novel Dracula.

The Tate Britain art gallery on Millbank is probably Pimlico’s most famous landmark.
Originally known as Ebury or ‘The Five Fields’, the area began to be known as Pimlico in the late seventeenth or early eighteenth century after a popular ale house owner whose premises, oddly enough, were in East London on a road known as ‘Pimlico Path’.

Property Types in Pimlico

Pimlico boasts over 350 Grade II listed buildings and several Grade II listed Churches within its confines and the area is an officially designated area of conservation, a status that seems set to maintain values beyond any short term fashion trend.

As demand for property expanded in the early Victorian years, Cubitt was contracted to build a network of white stucco terraces. The most impressive dwellings were built along St George’s Drive and Belgrave Road, and Eccleston, Warwick and St George’s Squares. Smaller-scale properties, typically of three storeys, line the side streets.

A second wave of development in the 1930s produced Dolphin Square, a self contained apartment complex of 1250 dwellings and home to numerous Westminster politicians throughout its existence.

The area also has Westminster Council run property and plays host to a network of cafes and restaurants of varying degrees of exclusivity.

Community, Society and Entertainment in Pimlico

The Tate Britain Gallery on Millbank is the dominant cultural experience that Pimlico has to offer, holding as it does the national collection of British art from 1500 to the present day.

The Apollo Victoria and Victoria Palace theatres are within ten minutes walk of the centre of Pimlico and the rest of the West End theatre district is a just a tube or a short cab ride away.

Pimlico has changed utterly in the last thirty years and in character is now a long way removed from the Stanley Holloway working class caricature of the post war Ealing Comedy Passport to Pimlico.

Indeed the pace of development has accelerated in the last ten years with countless cafes and restaurants springing up to support the growing affluence of the community.
Antique shops vie with restaurants for customer’s attention, especially within the confines of the increasingly fashionable Moreton Triangle.

Transport in Pimlico

With Pimlico station in the heart of the area and just a short walk to Westminster and Victoria underground stations, residents are spoilt for transport choices if they opt for something other than their own car.

Victoria mainline rail station, just a few minutes walk away, is the second busiest in London.

A river boat operates from Westminster Millennium Station beside Westminster Underground station serving stops from Greenwich to Hampton Court.
Several London Transport bus routes serve Pimlico.

Schools

With Pimlico station in the heart of the area and just a short walk to Westminster and Victoria underground stations, residents are spoilt for transport choices if they opt for something other than their own car.

Victoria mainline rail station, just a few minutes walk away, is the second busiest in London.

A river boat operates from Westminster Millennium Station beside Westminster Underground station serving stops from Greenwich to Hampton Court.
Several London Transport bus routes serve Pimlico.

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